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Deaf children are seen as bad or a curse

They are often called "Kasiru" in their language, which means "stupid" or "foolish". There are many deaf children in Uganda and they use a sign language called Ugandan Sign Language (USL)

Deafness is a disability that is misinterpreted in various ways. In fact, there are certain solutions that could have been done despite the communication difficulties so they could potentially start a conversation. Due to the difficulty of learning sign language, many people ignore children with hearing difficulties.

Deaf children are seen as bad or a curse. It is considered a spreadable disease and has no rights for it in Uganda. It is rare for deaf and difficult-to-speak people to get a job, making them very poor. Some kids find other ways to make money by doing the dirtiest jobs.

For most people in Africa it is impossible to send a deaf child to school and it is a waste of time. Most parents and families are very ashamed of a deaf and hard-of-hearing child, and these precious children suffer the most because their parents and communities reject them.
They can be locked in a cage, tied to a tree, and brutally abused.

"Please help build a school for our community" - 82 Year Old, Joy laments


We strive to provide our deaf children with the best possible education. We have deaf units in public schools that deaf children can attend.
We have a school in northern Uganda with 190 deaf and hard of hearing children, but only less than one teacher. There are also about 90 children in a unit in the east of Uganda. Around Kampala there are currently 30 children in an old school that is rented for training.

It all started as a small school for deaf children and a training opportunity for the most vulnerable children with sign language under a tree! We are happy to say that we have a few acres of land ready to start the construction of a deaf school center. We strive to be self-sufficient and support every child in this situation, but we need your support
"My child used to collect stained metals and make some money to pay for her sister's school fees. The police saw that he had goods with him and when they stopped him he could not understand or hear what they were saying and the police believed it was a thief. They thought my child was silent because he stole the goods and shoot him to death, please help build a school for our communityā€¯

Feed hungry children,Provide shelter to those without

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Deafness is a disability that is misinterpreted in various ways. In fact, there are certain solutions that could have been done despite the communication difficulties so they could potentially start a conversation. Due to the difficulty of learning sign language, many people ignore children with hearing difficulties. Like anyone without a disability, deaf people also need to communicate. Therefore, efforts must be made so that they can convey their thoughts and emotions just like anyone else. We provide deaf and hard-of-hearing child-friendly HIV/AIDS awareness and support programmes, working in both prevention and healthy living for children and their families. Taasa Orphan Program closely monitors those identified, provides backup and support needed to gain access to drugs and other necessities, and provides training to families and individuals. We have encouraged and enabled the creation of parent support groups, which, equipped with small start-up capital, have successfully introduced income-generating activities, particularly mushroom growing and soap and petroleum jelly making as well as small savings and loans. Some of these groups have now been active for over four years.

We are continuing to focus on:

  • Deaf awareness training with health workers ensures that access to services and information is deaf friendly.
  • Specialist training for primary school teachers on supporting special needs learners within an inclusive primary education setting.
  • Child-to-child activities to improve communications and break down barriers!
  • Development of active parent support groups;
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  • Sign Language Book

Positive change

  • Sign language trainings for parents of deaf and hard-of-hearing children.
  • Greater awareness, understanding deaf and hard-of-hearing child friendly information.
  • Hearing impaired children who have worked with the project have become real agents of change within their communities.
  • Year-on-year increase in academic attainment of hearing impaired children at primary schools, promotion and selection to secondary schools.
  • Silent drama groups formed by deaf and hard-of-hearing children to share information and communicate important messages in an expressive way while also making people laugh.